[everest] [K2] [oceans] [poles] [tech] [weather] [statistics] [medical]   
  
     






  Related links
Everest without a Big Rubber Mask
10:54 a.m. EDT Aug 27, 2003
Yesterday, snowboarder Stephen Koch provided an update of the team’s plans for summit day and his snowboard descent via the Hornbein-Japanese Couloir. Today, Stephen elaborates on his decision to go without oxygen:

“Oxygenless advantages...

As we pined away the hours in our Marmot Lair tent I reread our dispatch from the 25th and realized I failed to mention the advantages of not using oxygen after stating some of the disadvantages, or potential dangers, of not using oxygen.

Some other considerations of not using oxygen, besides the ethical reasons stated earlier, are; knowing exactly what state your body is in (if the oxygen runs out or regulator malfunctions), carrying less weight, being more in balance for the snowboard descent by not carrying heavy oxygen bottles, being able to see my feet during the snowboard descent by not having a big rubber mask covering half my face, not getting claustrophobic from having a big rubber mask covering half my face (during both the climb and descent), no icing up of goggles or glasses from a big rubber mask covering half my face, being able to communicate better with my partners by not having a big rubber mask covering half my face, bragging rights (if successful), being part of a super elite group of mountaineers -under 100 (if successful), looking better in photographs by not having a big rubber mask covering half my face, and no funky tan lines from a big rubber mask covering half my face."

- Stephen Koch

Image of Stephen Koch coming down from his first meeting with Chomolungma courtesy of Stephen Koch.


    Top Feature Stories
    
Latest News
   



Copyright ExplorersWeb Inc.  All rights reserved
[about - contact - press]